Pedlar Press has ceased production

Canada is about to lose one of its most consistently impressive small literary presses. Pedlar Press, located in St. John’s, officially ceased publishing at the end of 2020, says founder and publisher Beth Follett. The house will close on 31 December 2021.

Backlist books are available for purchase until 31 December 2021. Write Beth at feralgrl@interlog.com for more information.

Grateful for the incredible community support over twenty-five years.

 

EIGHT for $35: In Canada Only

Eight Pedlar titles for $35, including shipping.

Any eight! Available books listed below, some in small quantities.

In Canada only.

NOVELS:

Seeing Martin by Su Croll, The Search for Heinrich Schlögel by Martha Baillie, The Benjamenta College of Art by Alan Reed, The Causes by Cathy Stonehouse, This Is Agatha Falling by Heather Nolan,  The.Hope. by Craig Francis Power, From the Archives of Vidéo Populaire by Anne Golden,  The Drowned Lands by Stan Dragland, The Incident Report by Martha Baillie, [A Novel by Ken Sparling].
POETRY:
Light, Found and Small Arguments by Souvankham Thammavongsa, Niagara & Government by Phil Hall, Oderin by Agnes Walsh, Faunics by Jack Davis, Were There Gazelle by Laura McRae, Lamb by Michael Kenyon, Only Seemly by Guy Birchard, Local Haunts by David White, Vanishing Acts by Moira MacDougall, The Poison Colour by Maureen Hynes, Persuasion for a Mathematician and Waterworks by Joanne Page.
NONFICTION:
Sister Language by Christina & Martha Baillie, The Difficult and The Bricoleur & His Sentences by Stan Dragland, Winter in Tilting by Robert Mellin.
SHORT FICTION:
How You Were Born by Kate Cayley.
CHILDREN’S BOOKS:
The Lady From Kent by Barbara Nolan.


Souvankham Thammavongsa poetry

About the Author

Souvankham Thammavongsa’s first story collection, How to Pronounce Knife, was published in April 2020, to critical acclaim, by Little, Brown (US), McClelland & Stewart/Penguin Random House (Canada), and Bloomsbury (UK). The collection has won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize, Canada’s most prestigious literary award. Thammavongsa’s stories have won an O. Henry Award and appeared in Harper’s MagazineThe Paris Review, The Atlantic, Granta, NOON, The Believer, Best American Nonrequired Reading 2018, and O. Henry Prize Stories 2019. She is the author of four books of poetry, Cluster (2019); Light (Pedlar, 2013), winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found (Pedlar, 2007), now a short film; and Small Arguments (Pedlar, 2003), winner of the ReLit prize. She has been called “one of the most striking voices to emerge in Canadian poetry in a generation” (The Walrus). She is working on her first novel.

 

Small Arguments (2003)

Reminiscent of Pablo Neruda’s Elemental Odes, Small Arguments is a stunningly original debut by a gifted young poet. The language of Small Arguments is simple yet there is nothing simple in its ideas. The work touches on the structures of argument, orchestrating material around repetition, variation and contrast. Thammavongsa’s approach is like that of a scientist/philosopher, delicately probing material for meaning and understanding. The poet collects small lives, and argues for a larger belonging: a grain of dirt, a crushed cockroach, the eyes of a dead dragonfly. It is a work that suggests we can create with what we know and with that alone. || “This is the voice of a pilgrim, the one who bends to see, leans to hear. . . Thammavongsa has distilled her meaning from her details so masterfully and with such confident wisdom that she seems to be reading nature. Through her eyes, we can believe we see the true meaning in things.” – Anne Michaels

“A formidable work.” – George Elliot Clarke

 

Found (2007)

“In 1978, my parents lived in building #48. Nongkai, Thailand, a Lao refugee camp. My father kept a scrapbook filled with doodles, addresses, postage stamps, maps, measurements. He threw it out and when he did, I took it and found this.” – Souvankham Thammavongsa

The poems of Found, with their blank spaces and small print, their language so unforgiving in detail that every letter, gesture, break, line and shape becomes for us a place of real meaning, were built out of doodles, diagrams, drawings into a work characterized by the elegance and power of its bareness—to let us see and to hold back much of what we see.

 

Light (2013)

Souvankham Thammavongsa’s third book of poetry, Light, examines the word that gives the collection its name. There are poems about a sparkle, about how to say light, about a scarecrow, a dung beetle, a fish without eyes. Known for her precision and elegance, for her small clear voice, for distilling meaning from details, for not wasting words, Thammavongsa confirms her gifts with these new poems. Light is a work that shines with rigour, humour, courage and grit.

Winner of the 2014 Trillium Award for Poetry

 

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Support your local independent bookseller.

Congratulations to Souvankham Thammavongsa, winner of the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize

November 9, 2020 (Toronto, Ontario) – Souvankham Thammavongsa is the winner of the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize for her short story collection, How To Pronounce Knife, published by McClelland & Stewart. Thammavongsa will receive $100,000 courtesy of Scotiabank.

The remaining finalists, listed below, will each receive $10,000.

  • Gil Adamson, for her novel Ridgerunner, published by House of Anansi Press
  • David Bergen, for his short story collection Here The Dark, published by Biblioasis
  • Shani Mootoo, for her novel Polar Vortex, published by Book*hug Press
  • Emily St. John Mandel, for her novel The Glass Hotel, published by HarperCollins Publishers Ltd.
The winner was announced NOV 9, 2020  at the Scotiabank Giller Prize award ceremony, hosted by Canadian actor Eric McCormack, with performances by Canadian singer and songwriter, Diana Krall. The ceremony was presented commercial-free by Scotia Wealth Management on CBC, CBC Radio One, CBC Gem and streamed live on CBCBooks.ca.
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Pedlar Press offers our most sincere congratulations. Pedlar published Souvankham Thammavongsa’s first three poetry titles; Small Arguments (2003), Found (2007), and Light (2013).